Driver arrested in hit/run death of jogger in 2018

April 8, 2018 a hit/run driver killed Taylor White, a 21 y.o. GCU student that was jogging in a crosswalk.

Three years later, a driver was arrest on susp of 2nd degree murder (and presumably, leaving the scene of a fatal). There is much that is not said in the news article. 2nd degree murder indicates police believe they can prove the driver not only caused the crash that resulted (it was in a crosswalk, so that’s probably covered), but that the driver was doing something particularly reckless at the time — normally the only thing that will ever rise to that level is intoxication. The article says nothing about why he was charged that way.

This wouldn’t be the first time diligent policework led to a driver’s hit-and-run arrest much later, see e.g. hit-and-run-and-good-old-fashioned-policework/

Continue reading “Driver arrested in hit/run death of jogger in 2018”

Woman bicyclist killed in collision w/truck, horse-trailer

5/10/2020 ~7PM. 32nd St and Broadway Rd, Phoenix. victim 35-year-old Nicole Hicks.

Sunset was 7:19PM so not dark; depending on direction, sun glare could have been a factor.

The news description was a bit light on details; other than to mention the bicyclist was in a crosswalk, and that “Police say the driver failed to stop for a red light and was issued citations”.  No directions were included.

If the driver “ran” a red light, they should be charged with 28-672. It could also or additionally be a right-turn-on-red error. A somewhat common scenario is a driver approaching a red light rolls through while turning without looking or seeing a counter-flow bicyclist that has entered the crosswalk on a green/walk. Continue reading “Woman bicyclist killed in collision w/truck, horse-trailer”

Scottsdale settles bicyclist injury lawsuit

There was a bunch of information published about a settlement between a bicyclist injured in 2014 and the city of Scottsdale; After much back-and-forth the city eventually settled the case for $120,000; significantly less than the $1M ask, but significantly more than the city’s earlier offer of $60,000.

The city staff reports mention the cyclist had (already) settled with the driver, presumably the driver’s insurance, and as this was a strike-from-behind they probably just accepted liability. The theory of liability with the city is they should have, but did not, provide a bicycle lane or shoulder.

It provides an look at the machinations of personal injury law that those of us on the outside don’t usually see. Continue reading “Scottsdale settles bicyclist injury lawsuit”