Cardinals WR ‘Hollywood’ Brown arrested for driving 126 mph on the 101, troopers say

News of Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Marquise “Hollywood” Brown being arrested for criminal speeding driving in Phoenix last week makes one wonder if such excessive speeds are limited to professional athletes, or if it’s going on all the time and we only hear about when some sort of ‘celebrity’ is involved. See e.g. Arizona Diamondbacks outfielder Yasmany Tomas (105 in a 65); or state Rep Paul Mosley (R-Lake Havasu City. 97 in a 55, repeat offender. Brags on video of going ‘almost’ 120). 

§28-701.02. Excessive speeds; classification
A. A person shall not:
1. Exceed thirty-five miles per hour approaching a school crossing.
2. Exceed the posted speed limit in a business or residential district by more than twenty miles per hour, or if no speed limit is posted, exceed forty-five miles per hour.
3. Exceed the posted speed limit by more than twenty miles per hour in other locations.

Brown’s case # TR2022-129156 in North Valley Justice court; he was also cited for driving (alone, presumably) in the HOV lane.

This comes within days of actress Anne Heche obviously speeding along a residential street just before crashing into a house and getting badly burned.

More about ‘celebrity’ (I use that term loosely) and car-crimes; see this tag

CORRECTION: the original version of this article referred to a out-dated language in 28-701.02; it’s been updated with the current version, above. TODO: look up bill that did the update, 2019?

2 thoughts on “Cardinals WR ‘Hollywood’ Brown arrested for driving 126 mph on the 101, troopers say”

  1. You must be quoting an older version of ARS 28-701.02

    The current version says:
    A. A person shall not:
    1. Exceed thirty-five miles per hour approaching a school crossing.
    2. Exceed the posted speed limit in a business or residential district by more than twenty miles per hour, or if no speed limit is posted, exceed forty-five miles per hour.
    3. Exceed the posted speed limit by more than twenty miles per hour in other locations.

    So in this instance 20 over is in fact 85mph but 85mph where the posted limit is 75mph would not be “excessive speed” (though still prima facie evidence of a violation of 28-701)

    The state legislature really should consider a level beyond “excessive speed”, or tier the offense. 85 in a 65 and 125 in a 65 are not even remotely close to the same risk to the public. A felony speeding statute would make the consequences more consequential.

  2. Thanks for the correction. Last I heard that update was proposed but it had failed to pass, obviously it passed since then

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