Drivers are dangerous

McClintock and Apache wreck photo: Mark Beach/Fresco News

last week’s Uber-involved crash should highlight the current state of affairs: Drivers are dangerous. Tempe Police cited a “human” driver for making a bad left at McClintock and Apache causing the crash with the Uber/Volvo SUV to rollover on its side.  The Uber was being autonomously driven at the time, according to the company.

There are over 100,000 reported wrecks per year in Arizona involving motor vehicle drivers only, with hundreds dead and thousands injured; a driver is at fault in each and every one of those incidents. 

 

Uber’s self-driving cars back on the road after Friday crash in Tempe

…On Friday, a driver in Tempe was cited for making an illegal left turn and hitting one of Uber’s test cars, which was in self-driving mode

Most at Fault

In Arizona, every reported MV crash assigns fault, “Most-at-fault”, to the operator of unit #1. Traffic units are either a vehicle, a bicycle (“pedalcycle”) or a Pedestrian.

All crashes, by definition involve at least one MV; and as noted above the vast majority only involve a motor vehicle (a “single vehicle” crash) or motor vehicles. A small percentage involve in addition to a MV, a bicycle or a pedestrian (both about only 2% each).

In case you are wondering about MV-bike, or MV-ped crash fault-rates, they run about 50:50. For the period 2009-2015 the rate for bicyclists was 51% bicyclist-at-fault vs. 49% motorist-at-fault. There is some indication that bicyclists are over-faulted, that is to say faulted when there is no violation; but that would just be quibbling.

Motorists have higher fault rates in MV-ped crashes, 60:40 for the same period mentioned above.

There are about 110,000 total reported wrecks per year lately in AZ, fewer than 2% of those involve a bicyclist, likewise fewer than 2% involve a pedestrian.

 

One thought on “Drivers are dangerous”

  1. Most-at-fault query, peds and bicyclists; see this query to compute by jurisdiction:

    SELECT count(1) FROM 2012_incident i WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM 2012_unit u WHERE u.IncidentID=i.IncidentID AND u.eUnitType IN ("PEDALCYCLIST") AND u.UnitNumber=1 ) ;
    SELECT count(1) FROM 2012_incident i WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM 2012_unit u WHERE u.IncidentID=i.IncidentID AND u.eUnitType IN ("PEDALCYCLIST") ) ;
    
    SELECT count(1) FROM 2012_incident i WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM 2012_unit u WHERE u.IncidentID=i.IncidentID AND u.eUnitType IN ("PEDESTRIAN") AND u.UnitNumber=1 ) ; SELECT count(1) FROM 2012_incident i WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM 2012_unit u WHERE u.IncidentID=i.IncidentID AND u.eUnitType IN ("PEDESTRIAN") ) ;

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